IE10 Preview

Microsoft today has announced the availability of the second platform preview for its upcoming browser, Internet Explorer 10. The first platform preview was released in April. This new platform preview contains the same HTML5 engine seen in the recent public Windows 8 demos!

IE10 continues IE9’s precedent of enabling Web applications to do more in the browser without plug-ins. It also continues the pattern of offloading work to the parts of a PC that are best suited for them, like the GPU for graphics, and different processor cores for background compilation of JavaScript. Microsoft has been working on tying together Internet Explorer 10’s Trident rendering engine with Windows 8. Microsoft is expecting developers to use HTML5, Javascript, and CSS to build new immersive apps for Windows 8 and this new browser is yet another tool in doing so. Keep in mind that this platform preview has no toolbar, no address bar, and none of the regular menus.

You can read the full change list in the IE10 developer guide: here

Download Internet Explorer 10 Platform Preview 2: Internet Explorer 10 Platform Preview 2

SharePoint 2010 and JQuery

Recently somebody wanted to know how they could streamline activity on a site starting with reducing the overall page refresh count. Put simply, jQuery really is a lifesaver for this stuff. Combined with SharePoints web services and SPServices there is a huge amount that you can do without having to resort to writing any C#. The challenge, as with most things, is how to get started. Below are some simple examples of functional code that will work if you copy and paste correctly.

Example 1: Getting items from a list, in this case called “TestList1”, and output the raw response into a div tag called “demodiv1”
$(document).ready(function() {
$().SPServices({
debug: true,
operation: “GetList”,
listName: “TestList1”,
completefunc: function (xData, Status) {
var out = $().SPServices.SPDebugXMLHttpResult({
node: xData.responseXML
});
$(“#demodiv1”).html(“”).append(“This is the output from the GetList operation:” + out);
}
});
});

Example 2:  Getting all sub sites from a URL, in this case called “http://testserver/webapp1”, and output the raw response into a div tag called “demodiv2”
NOTE: The URL for the site can be defined in two ways, both shown. The one that is not commented is persistent – therefore rather useful!

$(document).ready(function() {
$().SPServices.defaults.webURL = “http://testserver/webapp1”;
$().SPServices({
debug: true,
operation: “GetWebCollection”,
//webUrl: “http://testserver/webapp1”,
completefunc: function (xData, Status) {
var out = $().SPServices.SPDebugXMLHttpResult({
node: xData.responseXML
});
$(“#demodiv2“).html(“”).append(“This is the output from the GetList operation:” + out);
}
});
});

Example 3: What kind of data exactly is being returned? Okay so if you have tried the first two examples you will have noted that the data really is kind of raw. Let’s see it in a popup. In this case the same code as above with a difference… Instead of updating a DIV tag we just populate a popup by using an alert.
Note: Play around with alert(“XML=” + xData.responseXML.xml); and alert(“xData: ” + xData.responseText);

$(document).ready(function() {
$().SPServices.defaults.webURL = “http://testserver/webapp1”;
$().SPServices({
debug: true,
operation: “GetWebCollection”,
completefunc: function (xData, Status) {
alert(“Status=” + Status + ” XML=” + xData.responseXML.xml);
});
}
});
});

Example 4: Okay, so now lets take the same data and wrap the title of each returned site in its respective URL inside of a DIV called tasksUL.

$(document).ready(function() {
$().SPServices.defaults.webURL = “http://testserver/webapp1”;
$().SPServices({
debug: true,
operation: “GetWebCollection”,
completefunc: function(xData, Status) {
// now iterate through the results
$(xData.responseXML).find(“[nodeName=Web]”).each(function () {
// for each one found get the title and wrap it with the respective Url
$(“” + $(this).attr(“Title”) + ““).appendTo(“#tasksUL”);
                });
}
});
});

Something old…

This is not new but it’s oft forgotten…

Every now and then when working with SharePoint you’ll notice that you do not have access to the “Edit Page” function via the “Site Actions” button.
Simply add “&ToolPaneView=2″ to the querystring of the URL (/Forms/DispForm.aspx?ID=1&ToolPaneView=2).

FreeBSD: Ports and Disk Space

Using the Ports Collection within FreeBSD will use up disk space over time. After building and installing software from the ports, you should always remember to clean up the temporary work directories using the make clean command. You can sweep the whole Ports Collection with the following command:

# portsclean -C
You will accumulate a lot of old source distribution files in the distfiles directory over time. You can remove them by hand, or you can use the following command to delete all the distfiles that are no longer referenced by any ports:

# portsclean -D
Or to remove all distfiles not referenced by any port currently installed on your system:

# portsclean -DD